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Archive for May, 2009

Monuments to the Past by lawrence_thefourth.

Remains of a bridge that once crossed the James River near Brown’s Island. Sights such as these aren’t uncommon when you visit the older parts of the city.

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Richmond, VA Photograph of J.E.B. Stuart Monument, uploaded originally by ctankcycles

An equestrian bronze statue 15 ft. high mounted on a granite pedestal 7 ½ ft. high embodies the Confederate States Army general of the American Civil War. The statue faces north and is the most animated of the Monument Ave statues. It was dedicated May 30, 1907.

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303 North Twelfth Doors by taberandrew.

These two doors formerly connected 12th Street and the courtyard
between the A.D. Williams Clinic and West Hospital. They are now in
storage.

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Richmond, VA Photograph of The Markel Building, uploaded originally by intheburg

Fondly known as the “Jiffy Pop Building,” this three story aluminum covered building was created by Richmond mid-century architect Haig Jamgochian in 1962. A fun fact, Reynolds Metal supplied the metal, each floor using 555 feet of aluminum, the longest unbroken piece of aluminum siding in the world. The third floor of the building was sledgehammered into it’s shape by Jamgochian in four hours. A contractor later finished the job on the other two floors in 1965.

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Richmond, VA Photograph of From Italy to Japan, uploaded originally by J.W.Photography

A great shot of the stairs and cascading waterfall that lead from the Italian Gardens to the Japanese Garden in Maymont.

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Richmond, VA Photograph of Nickel Bridge at Night, uploaded originally by Jeremy Ledford

Also known as the Boulevard Bridge, the Nickel Bridge opened in 1923 and was 5 cents until 1973 when it became 25 cents.

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Richmond, VA Photograph of The Virginia State House (1788) (2 of 2), uploaded originally by Tony the Misfit

Located on Capitol Hill, it was built in 1788 and is the second more continuously used statehouse in the United States. During the Civil War it was the Capitol of the Confederacy until 1865.

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